Everyone feels sad or low sometimes, but these feelings usually pass with a little time. Depression—also called “clinical depression” or a “depressive disorder”—is a mood disorder.

It causes distressing symptoms that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working.Research suggests that a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors play a role in depression.

Causes of depression vary from person to person, Women have depression more often than men. Biological, lifecycle, and hormonal factors that are unique to women may be linked to their higher depression rate.




Men with depression are more likely to be very tired, irritable, and sometimes angry. They may lose interest in work or activities they once enjoyed, have sleep problems, and behave recklessly, including the misuse of drugs or alcohol.

Many men do not recognize their depression and fail to seek help.To be diagnosed with depression, symptoms must be present most of the day, nearly every day for at least 2 weeks.

Depressioncauses-of-depression can occur along with other serious illnesses, such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and Parkinson’s disease.Depression can make these conditions worse and vice versa. Sometimes medications taken for these illnesses may cause side effects that contribute to depression symptoms.

A relationship between hypothyroidism and depression has been assumed for many years; however, the true nature of this association has been difficult to define with many conflicting studies. Sourcehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/

Nearly 10 million Americans suffer from hypothyroidism. The condition is much more common in women than in men, and becomes more prevalent with age. As many as one in five women will develop hypothyroidism by age 60.




Although researchers aren’t entirely sure why there is a link between hypothyroidism and depression, it is likely that some people are taking antidepressants when they should really be taking thyroid medication.

Here is a brief review of when clinicians and patients should consider hypothyroidism as a possible cause of low mood — and what to do next. Source: Health.Harvard.edu

For more information on ongoing research on depression, visit www.nimh.nih.gov.

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